high fiber

Spring Pasta

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Spring Pasta

Spring has sprung!! Technically it sprung March 20th, but I believe at that time we were experiencing the last vestiges of a polar vortex. It’s time to forget those cold, dark days because grey has been replaced with green, there are flowers to behold, and my face is beginning to lose its “ruddy” look. With the warmer days and thawed ground comes one of my favorite things about spring: asparagus.

asparagus, a spring favorite

Seasonal eating is tricky when supermarkets carry most types of produce year-round, regardless of growing season. My grocery cart, regardless of the season, typically has broccoli, spinach, grapes, and apples to name a few. But there are those special fruits and vegetables that, for both taste and price, I only buy when in season. Asparagus is definitely on this short list. Not only do I refuse to pay upwards of $5.99 a pound for asparagus, but have you tasted it when it’s not in season? I find it woody and lacking in flavor. It’s absolutely wonderful, though, in the spring.

spring pasta ingredients

Asparagus is a nutritional powerhouse. One cup has a mere 40 calories but 4 g of fiber, which is 14% of your daily needs. That’s a lot of fiber for a small amount of energy! It’s loaded with folate and vitamin K, at 67% and 100% of your daily needs, respectively. Folate is especially important for any ladies out there of reproductive age as a deficiency can lead to neural tube defects in embryos. It’s a good source of vitamins A, C, E, and some B vitamins. This veggie can really help you spring into a healthy lifestyle (see what I did there?!). A random fun fact I learned is that the white spears you occasionally see at the store or farmers market are the same variety as the green but lack chlorophyll. The shoots are covered with soil while growing to prevent photosynthesis, resulting in the white color. This version has a tad less fiber and tastes a bit sweeter.

asparagus

Asparagus can be eaten any number of ways and makes an excellent side dish. In this recipe, however, I wanted to incorporate it into a simple vegetarian main dish that can be prepared on the busiest of weeknights. What’s great about this recipe is its simplicity. You can buy the artichoke hearts and sun dried tomatoes far in advance without risk of them spoiling like fresh vegetables. Most of us have some form of pasta hiding in the cupboards, and I don’t know about you, but my cheese drawer is usually well-stocked. A simple sauté of the asparagus with a squirt of lemon juice is really all it takes to get this dish on the table, ready for a delicious meal showcasing a spring-time classic.

Spring Pasta

 

Ingredients (4 servings)

  • 1 16 oz bag whole wheat pasta (here I used penne, but use any noodle you like)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1 inch pieces
  • ½ medium red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 6.5 oz jar artichoke hearts, drained and chopped
  • 1 7 oz jar sun dried tomatoes, drained and chopped
  • Fresh lemon juice from ½ lemon
  • 2 cloves garlic, diced
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
  • ¼ tsp crushed red pepper
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions

Cook pasta according to package directions.

Heat olive oil in skillet over medium high heat. Add asparagus and red onion and sauté until asparagus turns bright green, ~2-3 minutes, then add the lemon juice. Cook for 1 minute, then add the artichoke hearts, sun dried tomatoes, and garlic. Sauté for 1-2 minutes until everything is heated through.

Combine the pasta and asparagus mixture. Add grated parmesan, fresh basil, crushed red pepper, salt, and pepper. Toss to combine.

Nutrition Facts

  • 576 calories
  • 26 g protein
  • 101 g carbohydrate
  • 17 g fiber
  • 12 g fat
  • 521 mg sodium
Hugo loves Spring
Hugo loves Spring
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Spicy Chickpeas with Carrots and Couscous

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Welcome, readers, to my inaugural food post!!  I hope you’re ready for a delicious, spicy weekday dinner recipe that will really titillate your taste buds.  But first, we have something to discuss.  And that something is couscous.  Couswhat?  You may be thinking “blah blah, trendy food alert” but I assure you, you are mistaken!

DSCN1677Couscous has been around for ages, and while it doesn’t look like it, it is actually a tiny pasta.  A staple in many parts of the world, especially North Africa and areas of the Mediterranean and Middle East, it is often served with vegetables and aromatic herbs and spices.   Traditionally it is prepared by hand and steamed, however supermarkets carry a presteamed and dried packaged version that needs only to be reconstituted in boiling water.  I admit I haven’t tried handmade couscous, but after reading about it I am ready to fly to Morocco to try some!

Marrakech dreams aside, the whole wheat couscous in my cupboard will have to suffice.  Most grocery stores carry couscous, whole wheat couscous, and flavored couscous.  I included pictures of various brands that are common in many grocery stores to help in your search.  I encourage you to avoid the flavored ones as they contain a spice packet that is loaded with salt.  Just dust off your spices and create your own flavors!  Between plain and whole wheat couscous, I suggest the whole wheat version.

plain couscous ww couscousseasoned

 

 

 

 

 

Both originate from durum wheat, a hard wheat with a high protein content, however the difference lies in the processing.  Plain couscous is made from semolina, which refers to a processing technique, in this case the grains left after the durum wheat is milled.  The whole wheat version retains the bran and germ of the durum wheat, resulting in a nutrient-packed product that has triple the fiber content compared to the plain couscous!

You won’t see couscous on a list of superfoods (quinoa, I’m talking to you), but that doesn’t mean it should be disregarded.  It has a mild taste that lends itself well to many dishes, and if you prepare the whole wheat version, you’ll be getting 28% of your daily fiber needs in one serving.  Now that is an excellent source of fiber!  If you’ve never tried it, I encourage you to check it out at your local grocery store, and if you like spicy food, then try the recipe below.  As a recent poor graduate student, this meal is budget friendly and quick to prepare on a busy weeknight.  The ingredients reflect 2 servings, and it makes a great next-day lunch.  Most importantly, it’s packed with lots of nutritious goodness from the vegetables, chickpeas, and COUSCOUS!

Spicy Chickpeas with Carrots and Couscous
Spicy Chickpeas with Carrots and Couscous

Ingredients (2 servings)

  • Spice rubDSCN1633
    • 1/2 tsp cumin
    • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
    • 1/4 tsp black pepper
    • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
    • pinch of salt
  • 1 14 oz can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 3 med carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 med red bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 med onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 jalapeno, diced
  • 1 1/4 cup cooked whole wheat couscous (~1/2 cup dry)
  • handful cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tsp Sriracha (per serving, optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 400⁰

Prepare couscous according to package instructions.

Mix together ingredients for spice rub.DSCN1640

Drain and rinse chickpeas; lay them out on paper towels to dry.  Transfer to a baking sheet and drizzle with 1 teaspoon olive oil.  Sprinkle chickpeas with the spice rub (save some to season the veggies) and toss to coat.  Bake for 30-40 minutes until browned and crispy.

While the chickpeas are roasting, peel and thinly slice/julienne the carrots.  Thinly slice the bell pepper and onion and dice the jalapeno.  The amount of jalapeno used will make the meal more or less spicy, so use as much or as little as you like.

Heat remaining teaspoon of olive oil on med-high in a large skillet.  Add vegetables and sauté, occasionally stirring for 4-5 minutes, until vegetables are crisp-tender.  If you have leftover spice rub, add some of the seasonings to the veggies while they cook.

Combine veggies, couscous, and roasted chickpeas in a large bowl.  Add the cilantro, and if you like, add a bit of Sriracha to your bowl for some added kick.

Nutrition Facts

  • 500 calories
  • 88 g carbohydrate
  • 18 g fiber
  • 20 g protein
  • 10 g fat
  • 340 mg sodium
Dogs want to be healthy, too!!
Dogs want to be healthy, too!!